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Students

The Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing is committed to student-centred learning that encompasses the principles of empowerment, engagement, discovery, diversity, equity, and knowledge transformation for nursing practice. These graduate students, supervised by Monica Parry, are driven to improve health care.

Post-Doctoral Fellows

Ann Kristin Bjørnnes, RN, CNM, MSc, PhD (2016-2018)
Email: anki@oslomet.no
https://www.oslomet.no/en/about/employee/anki/

Ann Kristin Bjørnnes was the Tom Kierans International Post-Doctoral Fellow at Bloomberg Nursing at the University of Toronto. Her research interests are focused on pain, quantitative research methods, sex and gender, self-management support, heart disease, and intervention research. During postdoctoral training Ann Kristin received the Women’s Heart Health Hackathon Trainee Award; funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health (ICHR) and CIHRs Institute of Gender and Health (IGH). She also received the Tom Kierans International Postdoctoral Fellowship from Bloomberg Nursing at the University of Toronto. Ann Kristin is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Nursing and Health Promotion at Oslo Metropolitan University in Oslo, Norway.

Doctoral Students

Ping Zou, RN, NM, PhD (2011-2015)
Email: pingz@nippingu.ca.
https://www.nipissingu.ca/users/ping-zou/

Ping is a former PhD student at the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include developing culturally sensitive interventions to support Chinese Canadians managing chronic illness in the community. During her PhD studies with Monica Parry, Ping was supported by the Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, Canadian Council of Cardiovascular Nurses, and a Bertha Rosenstadt Doctoral Research Dissertation Grant. Ping conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial of a Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension and Reduce Sodium in Chinese Canadians (DASHNa-CC) during her PhD. She is currently an Associate Professor at the School of Nursing, Nipissing University, Ontario, Canada.

Salima Hemani, RN, MScN, PhD Candidate (2015 – current) Email: salima.hemani@mail.utoronto.ca

Salima is a 6th year PhD student at the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto. Her area of research is South Asians and their risk for cardiovascular disease, particularly the self-management of chronic disease and adoption of a healthy lifestyle through engagement in preventative strategies such as healthy eating. South Asian individuals have significantly higher rates of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. Hypertension is prevalent in South Asian Canadians and there are various risk factors associated with HTN, from excessive sodium intake, physical inactivity, stress, alcohol consumption, smoking and lower levels of fruits and vegetable intake. 

South Asian Low-sodium sTudy (SALT) is a multi-method study. The aim of the pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a culturally tailored low-sodium dietary intervention in reducing systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, 24-hour urinary sodium and knowledge, attitude and behaviour related to dietary sodium. The aim of the cross-sectional study is to assess sodium intake, physical activity, stress, alcohol intake, smoking behaviours and fruit and vegetable intake and the knowledge, attitude and behaviours related to dietary sodium intake for South Asian Canadians living in Ontario. 

Abida R. Dhukai, RN, MN, NP, PhD Candidate (2015 – current) Email: abida.dhukai@utoronto.ca

Abida is a 6th year PhD candidate at the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto. Abida’s research focus is on women and cardiovascular disease, risk reduction, and the impact of gender and culture/ethnicity on health outcomes. She has completed a pilot feasibility randomized controlled trial aimed at improving physical activity among at-risk young South Asian women. This study was funded by a Women’s Xchange 15K Challenge Grant and the Bertha Rosenstadt Doctoral Research Dissertation Grant. Abida is a Nurse Practitioner with experience in nephrology, complex internal medicine and emergency medicine. She provides direct care to patients with acute and chronic conditions, including those related to diabetes, hypertension and obesity. Abida is very interested in physical activity, diabetes and hypertension and their effect on the micro and macrovascular systems, as well as the gendered sociocultural and ethnicity-related risk for cardiovascular disease. 

Heather Burnside, RN, MN, PhD Student (2018 – current). Email: heather.kewageshig@mail.utoronto.ca

Heather is a third-year PhD student at the University of Toronto in the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing. Her experience as a nurse working in rural/remote First Nation communities, as well as coming from a First Nations family who has been impacted by diabetes and its complications, has helped her to understand the significant influence diabetes has on the individual, family, and community. During Heather’s PhD studies she plans on examining the effects of how sex, gender and culture interact and influence self-management practices of Indigenous people living with type 2 diabetes with the goal of improving diabetes care and reducing diabetes-related complications. Heather has received funding from Diabetes Action Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) November 2019 Fellowship Patient-Oriented Research Award – Transition to Leadership Stream – Phase 1.

Deborah Baiden, RN, MScN, PhD Student (2020 – current). Email: d.baiden@mail.utoronto.ca

Deborah is a first-year PhD student at the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto. Her doctoral research will focus on addressing the cardiovascular health needs of mothers of African descent in Canada who have a history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Globally, women of African descent have the highest risk of developing and dying from hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (e.g., pre-eclampsia). There is also emerging evidence to show that a history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy predisposes a woman to cardiovascular diseases in the future. Findings from this research could inform culturally appropriate care of women of this population in Canada. 

Undergraduate Students

Michelle Duong (2020-2021)

Michelle is currently a second-year nursing student and research assistant at the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto. She has had the opportunity to explore the field of research and develop a greater understanding of women’s health by contributing to Dr. Parry’s projects. Michelle is currently working towards being better-informed about how policy and sociopolitical factors influence people’s abilities to achieve better health outcomes.

Margaret Harrington (2020-2021)

Margaret is a fourth-year undergraduate student in the Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education at the University of Toronto. She is interested in the impact of sex and gender on physical activity interventions used to prevent and manage chronic diseases and musculoskeletal disorders. Her undergraduate research is focusing on the biomechanical and health outcomes of young female athletes with a hip disorder called femoroacetabular impingement. 

Salma El Ali (2020-2021)

Salma is a 1st-year undergraduate student at the University of Toronto. She hopes to pursue studies in geography for her undergraduate education and has a particular interest in health geography and the social determinants of health. Through working with Dr. Parry, Salma has been able to get involved in research on women’s health and heart disease. In the future, she hopes to be able to explore other areas of interest in research, such as Muslim women and their experiences in the Canadian healthcare system, as well as obstetrics and lifestyle medicine.

Iman Arain (2020-2021)

Iman recently completed her undergraduate degree in psychology at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include improving the mental health and well-being of women facing heart problems through the exploration of self-management techniques such as meditation, relaxation, and mindfulness.

Visiting International Doctoral Students

Zhan Qu (International Student, China), 2017-2018. A Correlation Study between Self-Management and Health Status in Individuals with Hypertension in China. School of Nursing, Xi’an Jiao Tong University, Xi’an, China. Supervisor: Professor Xiao Mei Li (Xi’an Jiao Tong University).

Huang Yanjin (International Student, China), 2015-2016. Risk Factor Management in Chinese at Risk for Chronic Disease. School of Nursing, Central South University, Changsha, China. Supervisor: Dr. Guoping He (Central South University).

Luo Yan (International Student, China), 2015-2016. School of Nursing, Central South University, Changsha, China. Co-Supervisor: Dr. Judy Watt-Watson (University of Toronto), Supervisor: Dr. Guoping He (Central South University).

Ann Kristin Bjørnnes (International Student, Norway) 2014. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Effect of an Intervention to Enhance Patients’ Pain Management after Discharge from Cardiac Surgery. Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo. Co-Supervisor: Dr. Judy Watt-Watson (University of Toronto), Supervisor: Dr. Marit Leegaard (University of Oslo).

Visiting Global Scholar

Jingcan Xu (Visiting Global Scholar), 2017-2018. Chronic Disease Management: Diabetes. Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hunan, China.